Blue-faced Darner (Coryphaeschna adnexa)


TEXAS: Cameron Co; Sabal Palm Preserve - male - 27 May 2012

to get the above shot, 25 frames were necessary

although I actually got the "money shot" about half way through the shoot, I kept trying for "just one more"!  As you can see
about 1/3 of the shots results in empty frames, and (save the 1 good shot), the other 2/3 images of blurry flying dragonfly.







TEXAS: Hidalgo Co; Estero Llano Grande State Park - males - September 2011


TEXAS: Hidalgo Co; Estero Llano Grande State Park - female - September 2011



TEXAS: Hidalgo Co; Estero Llano Grande State Park - females - 5 July 2011





TEXAS: Uvalde Co;  Leona River at Ft. Inge Historic Park - male - November 8, 2009




TEXAS: Uvalde Co;  Leona River at Ft. Inge Historic Park - male - October 31, 2009



TEXAS: Uvalde Co;  Leona River at Ft. Inge Historic Park - female - October 31, 2009






TEXAS: Uvalde Co;  Leona River at Ft. Inge Historic Park - young female - October 31, 2009
(this specimen was collected - hand caught - in order to provide a voucher specimen for the county)



TEXAS: Uvalde Co;  Leona River at Ft. Inge Historic Park - female - October 31, 2009
observed perched high in canopy of oak tree feeding on butterfly




TEXAS: Uvalde Co;  Leona River at Ft. Inge Historic Park - male - October 24, 2009
(the above series took about 60 shots to get - I need to get back to the Ft. in the morning when the lighting will be better)




TEXAS: Uvalde Co;  Leona River at Ft. Inge Historic Park - ovipositing female - October 24, 2009





TEXAS: Uvalde Co;  Leona River at Ft. Inge Historic Park - female - October 18, 2009




TEXAS: Uvalde Co;  Leona River at Ft. Inge Historic Park - female - September 27, 2009
(1st two shots with flash at 1/200th, 3rd shot w/o flash at 1/400, shadows adjusted in photoshop)


TEXAS: Uvalde Co;  Leona River at Ft. Inge Historic Park - male in flight - September 27, 2009
Flight shots of these two bugs were very difficult to get, owing to them both being consistently chased off by patrolling Common Green Darners, Anax junius, and Blue-eyed Darners, Rhionaeschna multicolor.  This is the only one of about 20 flight shots that I took that was identifiable.